Musicals

We use the term "musical resources" to emphasize that we do not compose music. For these scripts we have begun with previously published music literature--a collection of related songs, a commercial musical (containing narration or drama a client wished to replace), or have compiled ourselves a collection of individual songs--then we have created a brand new package based around these songs.

On every subsequent page in this category we include the following warning, but it is too important not to include it here as well.

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly.
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information on every musical resource page includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

A New Hope

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 19 characters

Description
Time: late morning on Saturday, March 4, 1933.
Place: a county park in the rural Midwest. The occasion is the annual church picnic and outdoor worship service.

Once every year the good people of the All Saint's Community Church of Alden, Iowa celebrate the approach of spring by combining their weekly worship with a picnic, held in a small county park just outside of town. Ever mindful of the Midwest's intemperate, and unpredictable climate, the townsfolk rally quickly to take advantage of good weather—no matter where in the week it may occur. That is why this year finds them holding their worship and potluck picnic early on—and on a Saturday: The local radio station's weather forecaster had predicted freezing rain for the Sabbath and several inches of snow beyond, but sunshine and an unseasonable warmth for the day just before.

Theme
The country was going through hard times in the early Thirties. Families were losing their homes, their farms—losing hope in tomorrow. The "New Hope" of this musical is best expressed by Cousin Sadie, when she tells everyone...

Now, c'mon folks. Sure we got hard times. No argument there. And I know heaven starts lookin' real sweet when things are lookin' bad down here. But listen folks, there's no reason in the world to be thinkin' all's lost. You think the Lord don't see what's goin' on down here? You think His hand ain't in it?
Why, I remember the old days when things were really tough. (those listening raise their eyes: 'here we go again') My stars, we were lucky to even get supper before bed. We'd have to trudge a good fifty mile through snow up to here just to get to school. Why, this is nothin'. (more seriously)
Now listen, don't you go lookin' for no easy excuse to stop singin' His praise. The Lord's still on our side. He's still here with us. So when those blues start gettin' to ya, you just think of Jesus lookin' down from above. He's still takin' care of us--and if we only trust in Him, He'll get us through anything comes our way.

A New Hope will be a favorite—both with the audience and the choir.

Notes
This new musical is a reworking of our older script, Movin' Up to Gloryland. The dialogue has been deepened, and it uses new music from a book entitled Testify: Songs for the Soul-Winning Church.

For a "sequel" to this musical, consider Coming Home.

Characters
The Men of the Church
Albert
Henry
Merril
Frank
Sam Richards
Man #1
Man #2
The Women of the Church
Inez
Betty
Sarah
Woman #1
Woman #2
Wife of Man #2
Others
The Preacher
County Sheriff (Reuben)
Cousin Sadie
Mary Granfield
Delmar Granfield
Brother Harold

Music Information
This His Company script has been written to be used with the following music literature:

Testify: Songs for the Soul-Winning Church (WORD, 1998); compiled by Mike Speck; arranged by Mike Speck, Lari Goss, and Danny Zaloudik.

We strongly recommend that you contact your distributor or WORD MUSIC regarding the availability of choral books, Trax, or studio orchestration before deciding to produce this musical. At this writing, you may contact WORD at 1-888-483-0014.

Topics
Midwest Church Picnic Alden, Iowa Depression FDR Franklin Delano Roosevelt Hard Times Thirties Musical 1933 Poor A New Hope

Downloads
Dave
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Before the Throne

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

45 minutes / 1 worship leader/narrator

Description
Before the Throne is a worship musical suitable for Sunday morning service. It is a "cantata-type" musical, meaning a series of songs connected by narration. The Narrator is called the Worship Leader.

Depending on the traditions of the congregation, Before the Throne allows for unstructured praise-prayers by audience as well as performers and audience participation in singing worship choruses. The emphasis is on Biblical worship in this musical, stressing communal worship over (choir) performance. The script relies heavily on scripture.

Theme
"To Him who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, be blessing and honor and glory and dominion forever and ever." (Rev. 5:13)

Music Information
Great is the Lord
Rejoice, Worship and Sing
Let Us See Your Glory
Sing For Joy
We Exalt Thee
Psalm 150
His Love Endures Forever
Peace in the Midst of the Storm
God is Our Refuge
We Fought the Fight

TRAX used throughout; instrumental music used for offertory. His Love Endures Forever (Good Life) by Dan Burgess.

Topics
Worship Leader God's Love God's Care Before the Throne Praise Bow Down Cantata Choir

Downloads
Dave
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Coming Home

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

90 minutes / 17 characters

Description
Time: July 4, 1943
Place: Outside the All Saints Community Church in Alden, Iowa

Lieutenant Daniel Patterson has just returned home from the war. More than a year earlier he had been the pastor of the small All Saints Community Church in Alden, Iowa. Then he had felt God's call to become a chaplain in the army, and serve a different flock. But Daniel has returned badly wounded—both in body and spirit.

He is now angry with God, who he believes let him down in battle, and he is doubting his call. But through the wise and patient counsel of an old friend, and the welcoming grace of his flock, Daniel is restored to a position of leadership in the Lord's service.

Coming Home is an ambitious musical that will tug at the heartstrings and fill the soul with the joy of belonging to a God who loves His children no matter how far they may stray from Him.

Production Notes

  • Please note that this musical is longer than most—just about 90 minutes with songs and dialogue.
  • While it is not essential to its production, this musical is a sequel of sorts to our earlier musical, A New Hope, which takes place in 1933.
  • Copious background notes for Lieutenant Patterson and others are included in this script.

Characters
Lieutenant Daniel Patterson, Chaplain USA
Meredith Patterson, his wife
The Patterson's son (non-speaking)
Ephraim
Bertha and Edith Crowley
Sarah
Henry
Frank Miller, member of church
Edna Miller, his wife
John Foster, Elder
Harlan Garrett, member of church leaving the community
Portia Garrett, his wife
Ilene Jenkins
Theodore Krueger
Elisabeth Krueger, his wife
Patty Krueger, their daughter
Earl Hollings

Music Notes
This His Company script has been written to be used with the following music literature. All songs are from Songs for the Soul-winning Church: The Very Best of Mike Speck, Compiled by Mike Speck. WORD Music.
Choral Book:
0 80689 33217 3 / 301 0409 01X

Compact Disc:
0 80689 62622 7 / 301 0522 592

CD Trax Split:
0 80689 64512 9 / 301 4458 589

CD Trax Stereo:
0 80689 64612 6 / 301 4459 585

Studio Orchestration:
0 80689 33567 9 / 301 0850 255

WORD's toll-free Order number at this writing: 1-888-483-0014-or go to WORDMUSIC.COM

Songs Used:
If God Be For Us
Great is the Glory
It's Still the Cross
I Go to the Rock
I Go to the Rock (reprise)
He's the Only King
He's an On-time God
He Still Reigns
You're Still Lord
I've Got Joy
I've Got Joy (reprise)
Sold Out Medley

Topics
WW2 World War II Chaplain Midwest Musical Revival Anger Spirit All Saints Community Church Alden, Iowa Angry with God Lieutenant Pastor Stray Joy World War I WW1 Coming Home

Downloads
Dave
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Crown Him with Glory

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 2 characters (plus Narrator(s) and choir)

Note: For a non-musical version of Crown Him with Glory, see our one-act, Grace.

Description
Crown Him with Glory is an Easter musical.

"After His death and resurrection—but before He ascended to the Father—the Lord Jesus spent forty days moving about the area, visiting with those closest to Him and giving final instructions to His disciples. This had been a traumatic time for the remaining eleven; they had never before lived through anything like the experiences of the past forty days. There were still many questions left unanswered. Before ascending, Jesus told His disciples to remain in Jerusalem until the arrival of the Holy Spirit—without whom they would be incapable of continuing His ministry. Then He was gone—and many of the disciples, like the apostle Peter, turned away from that moment confused and uncertain about tomorrow."
(Narrator in Crown Him with Glory)

The apostle Peter and his wife have remained in Jerusalem after Christ's ascension—waiting, questioning, turning the recent events over in their minds. They are wrestling with questions that have no easy answers. The script contains moments of comfortable humor—especially with Peter—and moments of powerfully moving drama, as Peter recounts how on the night after they buried Jesus he walked through the silent city to the place where Jesus had been crucified.

Peter: I never told you this before. The night after they buried Jesus I went out into the city. The streets were so silent and black, and I wrapped the blackness about me and tried to forget what I had done. Even then I was so afraid—I was so afraid someone would see me and identify me with Him. (angry at himself) I was so ashamed, but I couldn't stop being afraid for myself. In my heart I knew what Jesus had said—that there was purpose in His dying. But in my mind I saw only a coward who had denied even knowing Him. He had trusted me, and I thought only of myself. (pausing to regain the image of that night in his mind) The street was empty—that twisted street that had been filled with people laughing and mocking and spitting their hatred. (thankfully) It was empty, and I embraced the emptiness like an old friend who understands your pain when no one else can. (wistfully, with sorrow) For the first time since that day Jesus found me, I could no longer feel Him beside me. (distantly) I was alone; very much alone.

Theme
In our weakness, Christ receives the glory.

Music Notes
The choral book originally used was Crown Him with Glory, by Dan Burgess; arranged by Dan Burgess and David Maddux (Discovery House Publishers, 1991).

Characters
Peter
Rachel (his wife)
Narrator(s)

Topics
Crown Him with Glory Grace Apostle Peter Marriage Doubt Anger Easter Cross Crucifixion Jerusalem Holy Spirit Ascension

Downloads
Dave
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From the Realms of Glory

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 7 characters

Description
From the Realms of Glory is an adventurous Christmas musical that includes a relationship between the pre-incarnate Son of God and a resident angel named Harry. The musical begins in heaven, just before Bethlehem, and ends with Harry, the angel, visiting Jesus (as a boy) on earth.
From the final scene between Harry and the young Jesus:

Harry (having a hard time believing what he thinks he's hearing): So, you gave up everything... only to—
Jesus (looking around): I love these people, Harry. I came to experience what it's like for them—what it's like to live with a body that ages and dies, what it's like to suffer loneliness and pain, to feel the pull of sin, to experience—as much as I can—what it is to be human.
Harry (impatiently, thinking that's enough): I'm sure You've already experienced all that.
Jesus: My living like them won't save them, but my dying like them will.

Theme
Why Jesus came to earth in the first place, and what this would mean for the people of His creation; His sacrifice

Characters
Harry
Son of God (adult)
Innkeeper (few lines, and solo)
Joseph
Mary (non-speaking, but solo)
Reader
Jesus (young teenager)

Additional notes about the characters (which were requested by, and delivered to, the commissioning church):

Harry, the angel
Harry is an older youth, or young adult. It would be helpful if he were shorter than the Son of God (and a nice touch if he were taller than the young Jesus). For dress, see the discussion below, under Son of God.

Harry is inquisitive, has a fast mouth (and slow brain), and is a nervous sort. The wheels are always turning, but sometimes they slip a gear or two. He should be energetic—but not frantic; full of the juices of life. The audience should like him immediately.

The actor should be expressive, know how to use his face to communicate; he should be physically flexible and mobile. This character is, in many respects, the lead (i.e., his casting would be even more critical than the role of Jesus).

Son of God

Because we meet Him in heaven, prior to His incarnation, we can't really call Him Jesus, now can we. As to his appearance, I see the standard tall, gorgeous tenor (when was the last time one heard a bass "Jesus"?) who could—or could not—be sporting a beard. I think because of his written personality, it's unimportant that he has a beard.

As to dress, there should be some coordination between Son of God, Harry the Angel, and the Angel Choir—as if the everyday wearing apparel in heaven has no relationship with the common perception. If heaven is timeless, why should they wear the robes of the First Century? Bottom Line: you should find some kind of neutral costume that can be worn by these. My idea was Levis and plain sweatshirt; you may have someone with a better idea.

Very good bosses or managers have a way of being friendly and personable with those who work for them, without getting too chummy. They have a way of being friendly, yet making it clear they are still in charge. This is the Son of God's personality in the heaven scenes. (Actually, also in the Jesus scene near the end—but that will be a little harder to pull off with two youth.) Not pompous, not "holier-than-thou"; warm and real, yet there's just something about the way He carries Himself that lets you know that He's God.

If I were directing this actor, I would probably not even talk that much about him playing pre-Jesus Son of God. He'd suddenly get stiff in the joints, his gaze would drift off into the ether with a holy glow, and he'd lift off the stage a few inches. No, play him like a person. And we already know God has a sense of humor, from His writings, so don't be afraid to play the lines for humor.

Jesus
Though small, this is actually a difficult part. This actor should display wisdom beyond his years. Put another way, he needs to look younger than he sounds or acts. There should also be some continuity between this role and the Son of God. I would even recommend that the one playing Jesus sit in on some of the rehearsals for the one playing the Son of God, to pick up mannerisms, etc. You could go so far as creating some gestures or mannerisms that could be shared; this would be a mechanical way to accomplish the desired continuity, in lieu of the more difficult sharing of mind.

Another thing that will be difficult for this short role is standing on stage while the youth choir sings to him. It takes a good actor to stay in character on stage while saying nothing.

Jesus would be wearing the typical "biblical" dress.

Mary

As to casting, something to keep in mind is that Mary would have been a teenager.
Mary has no lines; her singing voice is clearly the priority. She should simply portray innocence and an openness to the things of God. As is usually the case, the Mary song in this musical is very "mental"—portraying a woman trying to come to terms with a mysterious, supernatural event in her young life. As is also usually the case, the lyricist has given Mary a bit more eternal wisdom that I would like, but I think it's okay. I think it would be sufficient to find an older teenager with a good voice, who can sing expressively from the heart. More acting ability than that is probably not necessary.

Joseph

On a certain level, Joseph is optional. If your Innkeeper is a really good actor, he could sell his song without other bodies on stage. On the other hand, since I think I've proposed a good work-around for Mary, there's nothing to prevent her being on stage for "An Ordinary Stable", which means Joseph could be too, since he need not sing—or even act, for that matter. He simply needs to look interested. I would probably play the three of them entering together (as if he is conducting them toward their lodgings), crossing to center stage, where the Innkeeper will sing his song.

If you wished, Joseph could also be onstage when Mary is singing her song, but if so, you'd want him to be a better actor. It takes a better actor to say nothing at all--yet look like he has a reason to exist. Joseph could be off to the side, reacting lovingly to what she is singing, etc.

Innkeeper

After Harry the angel, this is your most flavorful character. You want someone who can really have fun with the role. This is one of those solos where vocal quality is not nearly so important as the ability to be interesting on stage. Let him take command of the stage, move around, play off the audience, as well as Mary and Joseph. They can be slightly intimidated by him.

If the Innkeeper does not sing with the choir on the chorus, give him some business with Joseph, such as miming how much he can charge: Joseph would rummage through his money bag (secreted in his girdle), while the Innkeeper stands there impatiently tapping his toe; Mary pleading with him to let them stay for the little they have. You could even extend it further: during the second chorus, have the Innkeeper's wife enter from the opposite side, give him what-for, pull on his ear, etc., timed so that right before his exit, he'll have something really pithy to say about her and things in general.

Music Information
The music for this production is from the Christmas musical From the Realms of Glory (WORD, 1996) by Dave Clark and Russell Mauldin.

Topics
From the Realms of Glory Harry Son of God Angels Jesus Bethlehem Nazareth Earth Heaven Lamb of God Sacrifice Death Mary Joseph Innkeeper Christmas

Downloads
Dave
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Glorious Impossible

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 2 characters (plus Narrator)

Description

Christmas is a time to celebrate Jesus—and what seems to many to be His impossible birth. One person who has remained skeptical about the things of God is Naomi, who runs the house where the aged apostle John rents a room. The tiny island of Patmos—to which John has been exiled—is where they live, and the absentminded apostle and his feisty landlady mix it up on an almost daily basis. One day, however, Naomi presents John with an opportunity to tell her the story about an impossible birth that happened so long ago in the town of Bethlehem—and the miraculous life that followed. (Narrator)

Theme
Christmas, the "impossible" life of Jesus Christ

Characters
The apostle John (very old)
Naomi, his middle-aged landlady
Narrator

Notes
The dramatic portion of this musical consists of 5 scenes, totaling approximately 30 minutes, and is available as a non-musical one-act under the title An Impossible Life

Set
The set for this production can be as simple or elaborate as the director desires. For the inaugural production the set consisted of a small, crude table and stool, with various set pieces scattered about for flavor. Pictures are included in the script.

Props
There are only two required props: a wooden stylus (writing instrument) and a small, rolled parchment.

Wardrobe
Both John and Naomi live in a rough, rural area, and neither are wealthy. Their clothing would reflect this.

Music Literature
This script has been written to work in conjunction with the choral book Glorious Impossible, published by Word Music.
Glorious Impossible features the songs of Keith and Kristyn Getty, Michael W. Smith, Stuart Townend, and Babbit Mason. Created and arranged by Tom Fettke. Orchestrated by Camp Kirkland.
Published by Simply Word (Word Music). Release Date: May 2009.
For pricing, more information, and ordering visit the following
web page: this page at the Word Music web site

Companion Materials
Choral Book 0 80689 43417 4
Compact Disc 0 80689 78922 9
CD Trax (Split) 0 80689 82612 2
Practice Trax 0 80689 65102 1
Studio Orchestration (CD-ROM) 0 80689 45567 4
Bulk CDs (10 pak) 0 80689 71772 7
Accompaniment DVD 0 80689 42009 2

Topics
Christmas Musical Apostle John Island of Patmos Landlady Bethlehem Salvation Impossible Life Jesus Christ

Downloads
Dave
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I'll Fly Away

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 13 characters

Description
A long-time, and highly regarded matriarch of a small local church has just passed away. She was a very old woman, and had been looking forward to going home to be with the Lord. One night she simply slept her way into His arms. The church has gathered to bury her, but there is very little sadness. They are here to celebrate her life—to rejoice together and to testify to the impact this saint has had on all their lives.

Production Notes
This script is very flexible for the Director in assigning roles. It has been written under the following assumptions: 1) This musical will be performed by a predominantly adult choir that would not include children, but may include a few older teenagers, and 2) the church may have some people who wish to participate on stage, but who do not sing, or are not able to sing solos.

Because of these assumptions, the script allows for flexible casting. For example, the role of George could be played by a choir member, or by someone who steps in unobtrusively at the appropriate moment—as if he were part of the choir. Additionally, the song that follows his segment could be personalized, and presented as more of a testimony, if he sings measures 26 to 42 as a solo—or it can be sung, as written, by the choir, or another soloist.

Characters
Choir/Chorus
In this musical the choir, or chorus, represents the fictional church congregation. Throughout the entire musical (save, optionally, during the last song) they remain in character—just your average folks from a small, evangelical church.

Pastor
In I'll Fly Away, the Pastor is the central figure. He is not the "lead" in the traditional theatrical sense that he is the most important character, but rather in the more traditional church sense that he is the spiritual leader of the group. He should offer a strong, trustworthy presence. The age of the character is not critical, but the person should be old enough to lend maturity to the role.

Jill
Jill is a mature teenager, sensitive to the loss of her dear friend, and observant of things around her.

Helen
This middle-aged woman is a strong aunt-figure (or just good friend) to Jill.

Choir Director
The choir director has only one line, but it is a good one. The Choir Director should be played by a woman, and one happy to put a lot of "juice" into the part. (Optionally, if the audience is to be invited to sing along during Those Good Old Gospel Songs, this character could be the one to step out and lead the singing. Or the Pastor character could do it.)

George
George is a middle-aged man and a Vietnam war vet. (This would make his age somewhere around 45 to 50.) It wouldn't hurt for him to be a strong, burly type, but this is not necessary.

Fred
A friend of George, Fred has a fast mouth and a happy, kidding nature. This part has just two quick lines.

Janet Barlow
Janet is a thinker, and, while her age is not critical, she should be old enough to have had some history with Edna Mae.

Loretta
Like the Choir Director, Loretta has one fast line that should be delivered well.

Bill Lewis
While Bill is the Chairman of the Deacons, this doesn't necessarily mean he needs to be aged. He could be in his mid-Thirties on up. He is a good leader, but is prone to periodic fits of temper when displeased. His fast mouth, however, is counterbalanced by his willingness to apologize for committing an offense.

Pallbearer/Scotty
Because Scotty is in, or is just out of, military service, he should be between 18 and 25 years old. He has a tough, defensive personality, but has been emotionally hit between the eyes at this burial service.

Pallbearers
With Scotty, three other pallbearers should be sufficient. They have no lines, and don't even need to express any stage presence. So this is a good opportunity to enlist willing volunteers without any stage experience.

Wardrobe
The entire cast should be dressed in simple, contemporary "Sunday-go-to-Meeting" clothes. The only exception would be for the (4) pallbearers, who should be dressed in similar (but not necessarily identical) dark suits.

Music Information
I'll Fly Away w/ We'll Understand it Better By and By
When We all Get Together with the Lord
Those Good Old Gospel Songs
He Came to Me w/ He Giveth More Grace
Victory Shall be Mine
He'll Understand and Say `Well Done'
Raise the Roof
Though Your Sins be as Scarlet w/ Wonder Working Power
When the Lamb Becomes the Light
Right Here and Now

from More Gospel Truth - Order #MB-746
Lillenas Publishing Company
Box 419527
Kansas City, MO 64141
Orders: 800-877-0700 (M-F 7:30 am to 6 pm CST, SAT 8 am to 1 pm)
FAX: 800-849-9827
Choral Promo Pack (Music Directors only) - L-9211C $6.00
Book - MB-746 $6.99
Listening Cassette (10-pack) $39.99
Accompaniment CD, Split-Channel - MU-9211T $65.00
Accompaniment Cassette Stereo - MU-9211C $65.00
Accompaniment Cassette, Split-Channel - MU-9211S $65.00
Orchestration - OR-9211 $250.00

"Right Here and Now" - Order #25986-0784-7
Benson Music Group
365 Great Circle Road
Nashville, TN 37228
Orders: 800-846-7664
615-742-6800
Fax: 615-742-6911
Octavo - $1.30 (5000 available)
Cassette Accompaniment - $14.98

Topics
I'll Fly Away Funeral Church Matriarch Heaven Legacy Pastor Pallbearers

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
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Is This the End?

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

Musical: 35 minutes / 2 characters, with choir
One-act: 20 minutes / 2 characters
cover

Description
This script is offered in two versions: a musical with choir, and a non-musical one-act. Both scripts are available for download at the bottom of this page. Also available for download below is a PDF containing our cover artwork that you may use for programs or publicity.

The Time: Late Friday night, after the burial of Jesus
The Place: Garden of Gethsemane

The disciples (and brothers), James and John have sought refuge in the Garden of Gethsemane shortly after the burial of Christ. The two disciples find themselves in utter limbo: What now? With Jesus dead and buried, do they now just go back to their fishing nets? What did it all mean? What was it all for?

Theme
The cross was the gateway to a new life in Christ.

Music Information
The four choral songs used in this Good Friday musical are by Ruth Elaine Schram (http://choralmusic.com/). These songs are...

- Garden of Tears
- Eyes of Heaven
- Tapestry of Darkness
- It's All About the Cross

All are available, with downloadable demos, at http://choralmusic.com/. Some Trax are available, but we recommend simple, acoustic piano for this production.

We strongly recommend that you verify the availability of choral books, Trax, or studio orchestration before deciding to produce this musical.

Topics
James John Disciples Good Friday Easter Garden of Gethsemane Crucifixion The Cross Death Burial Uncertainty

Downloads
Dave
Musical PDF for Production
Non-musical PDF for Production
Scaleable art as PDF

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)

Jesus Shall Reign

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 3 characters

Description
Peter and his son are on an outing, spending some time together during a rare break in the apostle's ministry. Joash has high hopes to grow up just like his famous father. Peter takes the opportunity to teach his son some humility by sharing with him the humility and sacrifice of Christ. In a powerful scene, Peter relives the shame of his denial.

Notes
Jesus Shall Reign is a worship-oriented musical with a strong dramatic element. The drama portion of this musical could almost be lifted out to stand on its own as a one-act play. The package is a powerful statement of the Lordship of Jesus Christ, and appropriate for Easter or as a general musical. The dramatic dialogue is woven artfully through the music--one element complementing the other, and there are moments of congregational response.

Theme
Easter; The Lordship of Jesus Christ; The Kingdom; His Sacrifice

Characters
Apostle Peter
His young son, Joash
Worship Leader

Props (optional)
Bag and traveling stick for Peter

Music Information
TRAX used throughout.
Book used: Jesus Shall Reign by Cloninger & Rhodes (WORD)
OUR GOD REIGNS
WE CRY HOSANNA, LORD
IN THE NAME OF THE LORD
THE KIND OF A KINGDOM
THY WILL
CROSS OF CALVARY
THIS LAMB ALONE
FAIREST LORD JESUS
ARISE

Topics
Musical Resource Multi-act Jesus Shall Reign Apostle Peter Joash Worship Remorse Lordship Easter Palm Sunday Kingdom Sacrifice

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
Plain Text for Review

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)

Movin' Up To Gloryland

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 14 characters

Description
For the choir that's ready to take one step closer to a real musical (from the cantata format), Movin' Up To Gloryland fills the bill. Every choir member on stage is a character and gets to dress up in old-fashioned clothes.

(For a newer (and improved) variation on this musical, with a deeper story line, see A New Hope.)

The time is late morning on Saturday, March 4, 1933. In Washington D.C. Franklin Delano Roosevelt is giving his first inaugural address while somewhere in the rural Midwest the local church is holding its annual picnic in the county park.

The women of the church enter and begin preparing a simple, yet hearty meal; the menfolk straggle in bemoaning the current depression and resulting hard times. On the radio, the crowd in Washington applauds a point in FDR's speech. The people have a faded, weary air about them—yet in spite of their near poverty, they have a strong community spirit of pulling together and a powerful faith in their God.

On the radio, FDR holds out hope for an impoverished country; at the picnic, the people know that their hope is in Jesus Christ—and that even if things don't turn around on earth, their will always be that day when they will be Movin' up to Gloryland.

Theme
Our hope and comfort now in Jesus
Our hope for the future in heaven

Notes
This musical—against the standard contata—will require a greater commitment to rehearsing dialogue. While the dramatic portions are relatively simple, they will require something beyond just handing someone a script. The best arrangement for the busy choir director is to place someone else in charge of rehearsing the dramatic portions.

Set
The stage should be set to suggest a picnic, using things such as papier-mache rocks, blankets, small picnic tables, etc. If artfully done, you could even use painted trees and bushes.

Props
An old wooden radio
casserole dishes
bread baskets
red-checkered cloths
old metal beverage cooler
apples, oranges, etc
picnic tables
blankets

Music Information
I'LL FLY AWAY
JOY COMES IN THE MORNING
THE SOLID ROCK
HE'S STILL THERE
GLORY TO HIS NAME/ARE YOU WASHED IN THE BLOOD
WHEN GOD DIPS HIS LOVE IN MY HEART
JESUS LOVES ME/AMAZING GRACE
TEN THOUSAND YEARS
COUNTRY CHURCH MEDLEY
GOOD-BY, WORLD, GOOD-BY
MOVIN' UP TO GLORYLAND

Joyous Songs for the Evangelistic Choir, Marsh (Benson)
Because of Who You Are, David Culross (Singspiration)
(Movin' Up To Gloryland is an 8vo)

Wardrobe
A good visual resource for costumes for this musical is the movie, Places in the Heart.

Topics
Movin' Up to Gloryland Midwest Iowa Farms Depression Thirties FDR Roosevelt Heaven President Hope Despair Picnic Country Church

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
Plain Text for Review

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)

The Choice

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 11 characters

Description
The Choice is a variation on The Essence of His Death (which is not a musical). The Choice is a complete, three-act musical that uses some of the same characters and situations as Essence.

The overall story line differs from Essence in the following ways:

  • Requires a complete chorus (choir)
  • Does not include the Sanhedrin scenes or characters
  • Does not include Peter or the "Denial" scene
  • Uses songs to progress the story
  • All scenes take place in Jerusalem

Scenes
ACT ONE
A marketplace in Jerusalem

ACT TWO
A marketplace in Jerusalem
A quiet garden
Golgotha

ACT THREE
The tomb of Jesus
Jerusalem

Characters
Dinah - our heroine
Abigail - Dinah's obnoxious friend
Fruit Seller
Sekhti - our hero
Hotep - Sekhti's simple-minded partner
Jesus
Man with Question
Disciples - non-speaking
Mary - non-speaking
Angel - non-speaking, but solo
Mary's Friends - non-speaking

Music Information
ACT ONE
The Marketplace (Chorus)
By Faith (Chorus)
Could He Be the One? (Sekhti & Dinah)
Call Him Messiah (Chorus)
Blessed Are They (Jesus (opt.) & Chorus)

ACT TWO
Here He Comes! (Chorus)
Thy Will, Not My Will (Dinah)
Crucifixion (Instrumental, with Chorus)
Could He Be the One? (Sekhti)

ACT THREE
Why Do You Seek the Living Among the
Dead? (Angel)
I Choose Jesus (Sekhti)

The music used is from the choral musical, The Choice, by Robert Sterling (WORD/Thomas Nelson, 1993). Call 1-800-251-4000; item numbers are
Choral Book: ISDN #3010255012
Cassette Trax: ISDN #3014233608X
CD Trax: ISDN #3019351588

Topics
The Choice The Essence of His Death Jerusalem Egypt Easter Dinah Sekhti Hotep Abigail Crucifixion Jesus Sermon on the Mount Marketplace Belief Faith gods

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
Plain Text for Review

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)

The Essence of His Death: The Musical

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

90 minutes / 18 characters

Description
This third and latest version the The Essence of His Death story line is a full combination of both His Company scripts: The Essence of His Death, and The Choice. It begins with The Choice (and uses the same music), but then adds back in all the scenes and characters removed from Essence for the original The Choice.

Confused?

This is a two-act production, running between 90 and 105 minutes in length, with a very large cast.

Hordedef and Sekhti, Egyptian purveyors of rare essence (used in the manufacture of perfume), have come up into Judea for the Passover. Familiar with the Hebrew holiday, they will be actively trying to separate the residents of Jerusalem from some of their hard-earned money. In the city, they are caught up in the political intrigue surrounding the trial and subsequent execution of a "prophet" from Nazareth. In the midst of it all, Sekhti falls in love with a young believer named Dinah.

Meanwhile, Nicodemus, a prominent member of the Sanhedrin finds the courage to renounce his standing in the Council and publicly claim this crucified one as his Master.

Men and women, young and old, Hebrew and Egyptian—all are somehow changed by this one called Jesus Christ. Some will hear His words but reject them as blasphemy; others will hear his words as wisdom, but never yield their lives; but some will believe and open their hearts, taking Jesus at his word and finally knowing the true Essence of His Death.

Theme
Why Jesus died for us; Human traditions vs God's word

Production Notes
Essence requires a standard stage-lighting setup and/or a curtain. Because His Company typically performs in church sanctuaries, we rarely use a curtain for scene changes, depending more on black-outs.

Characters
Sekhti: purveyor of rare Egyptian essence
Hotep: Sekhti's partner, a bit of a buffoon
Theodosious: greasy Roman merchant
Dinah: our heroine a pretty young woman
Abigail: outspoken, obnoxious friend of Dinah
Fruit Seller
Jesus
Malchiah: colleague of Nicodemus in the Sanhedrin
Nicodemus: member of the Sanhedrin
Jerusha: servant girl
Crassius: a Roman soldier
Lucius: a Roman soldier
Peter: the apostle
Caiaphas: the Chief Priest
Mary: the mother of Jesus
Artemus: servant of Nicodemus
Miriam: Dinah's mother
Angel: non-speaking, but sings solo
The Chorus

Set
In keeping with His Company philosophy, the set for Essence is nominal, allowing the audience to focus on the characters and action. However, this play would also work well with a more traditional background and set. If your facilities and budget will allow, you could use painted backdrops, scrims, set pieces, etc. In our production (staged in a typical, carpeted sanctuary) we "suggested" elements that could have been actual set pieces in another production. For example, for the well or spring in Act 1/Scene 4, we simply had the women dip their pitchers over the side of a wooden banister.
The following set pieces are required:

  • "Rocks" or something for merchants to sit on
  • Benches for sitting
  • Fire ring (instructions for construction included with script)
  • Spring or well (or area of stage to suggest same)
  • Rough wooden table

Props
5 large shoulder bags for merchants
Collection of glass and stone jars with stoppers
3 leather pouches for coins
Coins
Large handful of gaudy, costume jewelry (Theodosius)
Water pouch
Large broken crusts of bread
1 medium size fish (e.g., trout)
Collection of sticks for fire
Swords for soldiers
Collection of pottery waterjugs and baskets for women
Water
Collection of jugs, baskets, sticks, etc. for extras
Large impressive chair for Caiaphas (optional;depends on blocking)
25 lb. bag of kitty litter (painted; for spices in Act 3/Scene 1)
Collection of blankets

Music Information
The music used is from the choral musical, The Choice, by Robert Sterling (WORD/Thomas Nelson, 1993). Call 1-800-251-4000; item numbers are
Choral Book: ISDN #3010255012
Cassette Trax: ISDN #3014233608X
CD Trax: ISDN #3019351588

Topics
The Essence of His Death The Choice Jesus Crucifixion Sacrifice Egypt Sekhti Hordedef Dinah Peter Denial Caiaphas Nicodemus Perfume Spice Easter

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
Plain Text for Review

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)

The Prophecy

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

Please note especially for this musical: The music is very old. The choral book was published in 1982, and the demo released by the publisher was not on a CD, not even a cassette, but a long-playing record! The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.

60 minutes / 10 characters

Description
The primary source for The Prophecy is the first chapter of the gospel according to Luke.

The Prophecy was the first part of an ambitious tetralogy we produced in the 1980s. Consisting of one musical, two cantatas and one play, the tetralogy—entitled I Must Decrease; He Must Increase—told the story of Christ, from the birth of John the Baptist to the resurrection.

Our guess is that few people would choose to do all four productions as a package, as we did, and without question the music literature and Trax for which the cantatas and musicals were written are now utterly unavailable. Currently we offer the scripts for this musical and The Surrender, a non-musical.

Zechariah and Elizabeth are people "righteous in the sight of God." Both are from priestly families and of advanced years. Elizabeth is considered barren and beyond the years of childbirth. This has been a major disappointment in their life. But God has not forgotten them. He will use them to introduce His plan for the salvation of all through His Son, Jesus Christ.

John the Baptist came into this world to prepare the way for the Christ; Jesus came into this world as the Christ—the Messiah. Together they changed for all time the relationship people would have with God. They were the turning point from a religion of salvation by works and the law to a life of eternal light by acceptance of the Savior.

Scenes
Prologue: Mary's Soliloquy after the ascension of Jesus

Act One
Scene One: Zechariah's house in a city of Judah
Scene Two: Jerusalem Temple; the next week
Scene Three: Zechariah's house
Scene Four: The local synagogue

Act Two
Scene One: Zechariah's house; six months later

Act Three
Scene One: A street outside Zech's house; 3 months later
Scene Two: Zechariah's house; eight days later

Characters
Mary (for Prologue, an old woman; later, as younger)
Zechariah
Elizabeth
Anna
Gabriel (in original production an off-stage voice)
Rabbi
Thomas
Aaron
Midwife
John (as an eight-day old baby)

Props
Armload of firewood
Cradle for firewood
Rude, household table
Misc. foodstuffs (vegetables, bread, etc.)
Traveling stick and bag
Altar at temple, Incense
Benches for synagogue
Scrolls
Pitcher & drinking cup(s)
Writing slate (for last scene)

Music Information
O Come, O Come Emmanuel (Program music)

Act One
Scene One: A Promise is a Promise - Zechariah & Elizabeth
Where Do We Go From Here - Zechariah, Elizabeth & Anna
Scene Two: He Will Be Great - Gabriel & Zechariah

Act Two
Scene One: I Can't Believe It - Elizabeth
Sing Out My Soul - Mary

Act Three
Scene Two: Blessed Be the Lord - Zechariah & Company
For Unto Us/Glory to God - Anna & Company

All music is from Dawn of Promise by Walt Harrah, Word publishers (1982).
Book #38003; Trax #DT 61 (reel); #DC 61 (cassette); Record #WSB-8882

Topics
The Prophecy Zechariah Zachariah Elizabeth Mary Anna Gabriel John the Baptist Belief Faith Pregnancy Temple Priestess Rabbi Disciples Mute

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
Plain Text for Review

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)

There's Room in My Heart

Important Note: When our musical scripts were first written, the choral and accompaniment music for which they were written were current and available. But Christian music literature has a brief shelf life; it goes out of print quickly. (We do not compose music, but write dramatic scripts that work with existing published music literature.)
Rather than remove our scripts because the associated music literature may no longer be available, we have opted to give our users the opportunity to either locate the original music on their own, or substitute music of their own choosing.
Do not plan on using one of our musical scripts until you have made this decision.

The information below includes everything we know about the music literature originally used for this musical. Nothing is gained by writing us for more.
Please note especially for this musical: The music is very old. It would take a miraculous act of God for you to locate the music or Trax. If you do not wish to add music of your own choice, consider doing the non-musical version of this script:
Vacancy.

60 minutes / 7 characters

Description
A rich, fully-textured Christmas musical, There's Room in My Heart includes two mysterious "Visitors" (narrators), drama centered around the Bethlehem inkeeper and his family, and powerful music by one of today's best writers, J. Daniel Smith.

The two "Visitors" (mysteriously dark, other-worldly types) take us back to the time of Jesus' birth to show us that those people, too, had daily pressures and self-centered priorities that prevented the Christ from entering their hearts. Christmas for them was also a time of crass commercialism.

Theme
Letting Jesus into your heart to replace the emptiness of this world.

Production Note
This musical lends itself perfectly to a strong invitation by the Pastor at the end. The script includes a spot for this.

Characters
Narrator/Leader
The Visitors (2)
Simon, the Innkeeper
Joanna, his wife
Nathanael, their son
Eliezer, their neighbor

Set
This musical is designed to have three separate areas of the stage: the larger area for the choir, a separate area for the drama, and two isolated areas (such as organ chambers, baptistry, etc.) for the "Visitors." Lighting is important to this production. The drama needs to be lighted as you would any play and requires blackouts. The "Visitors" require dark, mysterious lighting and black backgrounds so that, ideally, they are simply bodiless faces looking out of darkness.

Music Information
COME TO MY HEART, LORD JESUS
ARISE, SHINE
BEHOLD YOUR GOD
NO ROOM
MARY'S SONG
THOU SHALT CALL HIS NAME/THEN HE CAME
SHEPHERDS BESIDE THEMSELVES
GLORY TO GOD
I HAVE SEEN THE KING
THE ANGELS REJOICE
A GREAT JOY
OVERTURE

Most music from the book A Great Joy by J. Daniel Smith (Good Life Productions).

PLEASE NOTE: As stated above, the original music is no longer available—from any source. Please do not consider using this script unless you are prepared to insert new music of your choosing. We recommend, as an alternative, using the non-musical version of this script, entitled Vacancy.

Topics
There's Room in My Heart Christmas Innkeeper Jesus Baby Bethlehem Roman Soldiers Simon Pressures Business Peace

Downloads
Dave
PDF for Production
Plain Text for Review

(Download: right-click / View: left-click)